Will Pearson is a London-based panoramic photographer, working worldwide. He is known for sweeping cityscapes that capture the essence of a skyline, yet allow the viewer in to experience the minutiae of the city in razor-sharp detail. One of his major passions is to document London’s ever-changing skyline in all its chaos and beauty. Will’s work comprises cityscapes, landscapes and 360 photography.

30 St Mary Axe 360 Panorama, Dawn to Dusk

30 St Mary Axe 360 Panorama, Dawn to Dusk

One of the City of London’s most iconic buildings is 11 this year. The building commonly known as ‘the Gherkin’ ...
Canary Wharf Pier

Canary Wharf Pier

View across the River Thames from Rotherhithe over to Canary Wharf. Canary Wharf Pier is visible down on the water, ...
Isle of Dogs

Isle of Dogs

Canary Wharf was built on the old West India Docks in the Isle of Dogs. With the advent of major ...
Silvered City

Silvered City

View over some of London’s most iconic buildings. After St Paul’s Cathedral, Tower 42 is the grand old lady of ...
Winter Sun London

Winter Sun London

View from the roof of the Leadenhall Building looking out over London in the January sun. This is one of ...
london-from-the-leadenhall

London from The Leadenhall

London is so vast, and such a city of architectural extremes that each new vantage point on high gives a ...
Lambent London

Lambent London – View From 30 St Mary Axe

When setting up a shoot from a tall building, it's easy to become absorbed in the technicalities. The kit, the ...
Planate London

Planate London – London Bridge Quarter

No.1 London Bridge (the building with the cut-out section right by the bridge) forms the foreground to the dramatic cluster ...
Tenaya Lake, California

Tenaya Lake: California

If you visit Yosemite between May and November, you can reach the mile-long Tenaya Lake via the Tioga Pass Road ...

Tag Cloud

This section aims to give a little history of panoramas and virtual tours for those who are interested. I’ve also provided some background for some of the portfolios, but please feel free to skip this section if you’d prefer to simply explore the site for yourself. What is a panorama? Going right back to the Oxford English Dictionary, a panorama is "an unbroken view of a surrounding region". The term is a relatively recent one, being coined in 1789 by the painter, Robert Barker, who exhibited his painting of Edinburgh "The Panorama" (not termed panoramic for another 20 years) in London, charging visitors an entry fee to see this spectacle. The term was taken from the Greek 'pan' meaning 'all' and 'horama' meaning 'view' or 'see'. Although the term was new, the concept wasn't, and long images that provided 'unbroken views' were previously known as 'prospects'. Hollar's 'The Long View' etching (created between 1636 and 1644) was hugely popular with Londoners and has given us a wealth of knowledge about London before it was decimated in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Panoramic cameras and processes have been around since 1843. The technology has gone through various incarnations over the last 150 years or so, and there are now two main methods of capturing panoramas. A 'scanning' camera (Panoscan) can be used or a series of photos can be taken and then stitched together. My panoramas are created with this latter method of ‘stitching’ images together. What is a gigapixel or deep zoom panorama? Many people are familiar with the term 'Gigapan'. The GigaPan project is a collaboration between Google, Carnegie Mellon University and Nasa. The GigaPan is a robotic camera mount which allows users to capture a range of large images which can be joined together into one gigantic image. The GigaPan is only one such mount, and there are alternatives which are built and customised by individual photographers. The gigapixel panoramas which I create are intended not just as a curiosity, but as gigantic image files which mean the images can be reproduced at large sizes whilst maintaining excellent quality. Large-scale photographic quality prints allow the user to look closely into a scene and see the detail - inside skyscraper windows for example - even from a distance. You can really get lost viewing images at this size and resolution. One of my skyline panoramas was used by an interior designer at 32 metres long on a wall at the Cable & Wireless HQ. Supersite posters, street furniture, large scale prints and architectural features are all possible with image sizes much bigger than is usually available. What is a 360 Interactive? Interactive 360s are known by an array of different names: virtual tours; 360 tours; virtual reality tours and QTVRs to name the main ones. The name QTVR comes from QuickTime Virtual Reality - the image file format developed by Apple and launched in 1994 to allow the creation and viewing of 360 images. Interactive 360s are created by capturing a number of different images, stitching them together and then using viewing software to present them in an interactive format, so the viewer can manipulate them as if they're within the space looking around them. What is a cityscape? The cityscape brings together the panoramic views I have captured of various cities around the world. These are sometimes known as city skylines, skyline panoramas, city landscapes or less commonly as townscapes. What can I expect from your blog? The photography blog is updated whenever I have a new image or new project to talk about. I blog the latest gigapixel images, advertising commissions, trips and developments.